theparchedpaddlers:

Sunday morning paddle. Photo-kayaker is ready. Kayak and gear on river bank and down the river we go. Beautiful weather today!

Reblogging my husband’s post from our kayaking blog, The Parched Paddlers. Our Sunday morning kayak down the Lower Salt River. theparchedpaddlers:

Sunday morning paddle. Photo-kayaker is ready. Kayak and gear on river bank and down the river we go. Beautiful weather today!

Reblogging my husband’s post from our kayaking blog, The Parched Paddlers. Our Sunday morning kayak down the Lower Salt River. theparchedpaddlers:

Sunday morning paddle. Photo-kayaker is ready. Kayak and gear on river bank and down the river we go. Beautiful weather today!

Reblogging my husband’s post from our kayaking blog, The Parched Paddlers. Our Sunday morning kayak down the Lower Salt River. theparchedpaddlers:

Sunday morning paddle. Photo-kayaker is ready. Kayak and gear on river bank and down the river we go. Beautiful weather today!

Reblogging my husband’s post from our kayaking blog, The Parched Paddlers. Our Sunday morning kayak down the Lower Salt River. theparchedpaddlers:

Sunday morning paddle. Photo-kayaker is ready. Kayak and gear on river bank and down the river we go. Beautiful weather today!

Reblogging my husband’s post from our kayaking blog, The Parched Paddlers. Our Sunday morning kayak down the Lower Salt River.

theparchedpaddlers:

Sunday morning paddle. Photo-kayaker is ready. Kayak and gear on river bank and down the river we go. Beautiful weather today!

Reblogging my husband’s post from our kayaking blog, The Parched Paddlers. Our Sunday morning kayak down the Lower Salt River.

A last but wonderful view of Colorado. Great Sand Dunes National Park and the Sangre de Cristo mountains.

A worried mama grouse and her baby. Lead King Basin trail, Colorado. June 2014. A worried mama grouse and her baby. Lead King Basin trail, Colorado. June 2014.

A worried mama grouse and her baby. Lead King Basin trail, Colorado. June 2014.

United States Civilian Conservation Corp built Chapman Dam in the White River National Forest, Colorado from 1933-1936.

Formed in March 1933, the Civilian Conservation Corps, CCC, was one of the first New Deal programs. It was a public works project intended to promote environmental conservation and to build good citizens through vigorous, disciplined outdoor labor. Close to the heart of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the CCC combined his interests in conservation and universal service for youth. He believed that this civilian “tree army” would relieve the rural unemployed and keep youth “off the city street corners.”

A taste of the road on the back end of Lead King Basin trail just past Crystal Mill in Colorado. Our guide is talking about the vehicle that slid down the left hand side. Comforting.

americanguide:

THE NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON - SOUTHWEST UNITED STATES
I first moved into the New Mexico high desert some years ago during the start of the monsoon season. Having come from water-rich Minnesota, I didn’t really fully understand its importance.
I vividly recall sitting in an office in full of people and hearing the first drops of rain hit our metal roof and then getting progressively louder and faster.  
One by one, each person in the office got up and walked outside until the entire office was standing under the awning staring, silently, at the rain as it fell and the air turned sweet with a strange earthy perfume I had never smelled.
This ritual was repeated every time it rained for the rest of the summer.
Come the next year, after four nearly cloudless months, I was in the office as the first monsoon rains began. Without even thinking about it I walked right outside and stared at the rain just like everyone else.
The North American Monsoon, otherwise known as the Mexican Monsoon or the Arizona Monsoon, is a pronounced weather pattern change over the Southwestern United States. It generally starts in early July and continues through mid-September.  
This seasonal pattern change brings moisture up from the Gulfs of California and Mexico. This departure from the normal west to east flow decreases rain on the Great Plains and increases rain on the east coast.  But most importantly, it brings the rains that bring the mountains and the deserts of the Southwest to life.
The coming of the monsoon ends the dry and clear skies of May and June and begins a daily pattern of slowly building giant clouds until the early afternoon and then, if you are lucky, it might rain a little.  
But more often than not it doesn’t.  
When it does, it lifts everyone’s mood at once and it becomes the most fascinating thing you have ever seen.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and @inlandwest


Living in Arizona, I know exactly how that feels. americanguide:

THE NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON - SOUTHWEST UNITED STATES
I first moved into the New Mexico high desert some years ago during the start of the monsoon season. Having come from water-rich Minnesota, I didn’t really fully understand its importance.
I vividly recall sitting in an office in full of people and hearing the first drops of rain hit our metal roof and then getting progressively louder and faster.  
One by one, each person in the office got up and walked outside until the entire office was standing under the awning staring, silently, at the rain as it fell and the air turned sweet with a strange earthy perfume I had never smelled.
This ritual was repeated every time it rained for the rest of the summer.
Come the next year, after four nearly cloudless months, I was in the office as the first monsoon rains began. Without even thinking about it I walked right outside and stared at the rain just like everyone else.
The North American Monsoon, otherwise known as the Mexican Monsoon or the Arizona Monsoon, is a pronounced weather pattern change over the Southwestern United States. It generally starts in early July and continues through mid-September.  
This seasonal pattern change brings moisture up from the Gulfs of California and Mexico. This departure from the normal west to east flow decreases rain on the Great Plains and increases rain on the east coast.  But most importantly, it brings the rains that bring the mountains and the deserts of the Southwest to life.
The coming of the monsoon ends the dry and clear skies of May and June and begins a daily pattern of slowly building giant clouds until the early afternoon and then, if you are lucky, it might rain a little.  
But more often than not it doesn’t.  
When it does, it lifts everyone’s mood at once and it becomes the most fascinating thing you have ever seen.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and @inlandwest


Living in Arizona, I know exactly how that feels. americanguide:

THE NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON - SOUTHWEST UNITED STATES
I first moved into the New Mexico high desert some years ago during the start of the monsoon season. Having come from water-rich Minnesota, I didn’t really fully understand its importance.
I vividly recall sitting in an office in full of people and hearing the first drops of rain hit our metal roof and then getting progressively louder and faster.  
One by one, each person in the office got up and walked outside until the entire office was standing under the awning staring, silently, at the rain as it fell and the air turned sweet with a strange earthy perfume I had never smelled.
This ritual was repeated every time it rained for the rest of the summer.
Come the next year, after four nearly cloudless months, I was in the office as the first monsoon rains began. Without even thinking about it I walked right outside and stared at the rain just like everyone else.
The North American Monsoon, otherwise known as the Mexican Monsoon or the Arizona Monsoon, is a pronounced weather pattern change over the Southwestern United States. It generally starts in early July and continues through mid-September.  
This seasonal pattern change brings moisture up from the Gulfs of California and Mexico. This departure from the normal west to east flow decreases rain on the Great Plains and increases rain on the east coast.  But most importantly, it brings the rains that bring the mountains and the deserts of the Southwest to life.
The coming of the monsoon ends the dry and clear skies of May and June and begins a daily pattern of slowly building giant clouds until the early afternoon and then, if you are lucky, it might rain a little.  
But more often than not it doesn’t.  
When it does, it lifts everyone’s mood at once and it becomes the most fascinating thing you have ever seen.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and @inlandwest


Living in Arizona, I know exactly how that feels. americanguide:

THE NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON - SOUTHWEST UNITED STATES
I first moved into the New Mexico high desert some years ago during the start of the monsoon season. Having come from water-rich Minnesota, I didn’t really fully understand its importance.
I vividly recall sitting in an office in full of people and hearing the first drops of rain hit our metal roof and then getting progressively louder and faster.  
One by one, each person in the office got up and walked outside until the entire office was standing under the awning staring, silently, at the rain as it fell and the air turned sweet with a strange earthy perfume I had never smelled.
This ritual was repeated every time it rained for the rest of the summer.
Come the next year, after four nearly cloudless months, I was in the office as the first monsoon rains began. Without even thinking about it I walked right outside and stared at the rain just like everyone else.
The North American Monsoon, otherwise known as the Mexican Monsoon or the Arizona Monsoon, is a pronounced weather pattern change over the Southwestern United States. It generally starts in early July and continues through mid-September.  
This seasonal pattern change brings moisture up from the Gulfs of California and Mexico. This departure from the normal west to east flow decreases rain on the Great Plains and increases rain on the east coast.  But most importantly, it brings the rains that bring the mountains and the deserts of the Southwest to life.
The coming of the monsoon ends the dry and clear skies of May and June and begins a daily pattern of slowly building giant clouds until the early afternoon and then, if you are lucky, it might rain a little.  
But more often than not it doesn’t.  
When it does, it lifts everyone’s mood at once and it becomes the most fascinating thing you have ever seen.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and @inlandwest


Living in Arizona, I know exactly how that feels. americanguide:

THE NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON - SOUTHWEST UNITED STATES
I first moved into the New Mexico high desert some years ago during the start of the monsoon season. Having come from water-rich Minnesota, I didn’t really fully understand its importance.
I vividly recall sitting in an office in full of people and hearing the first drops of rain hit our metal roof and then getting progressively louder and faster.  
One by one, each person in the office got up and walked outside until the entire office was standing under the awning staring, silently, at the rain as it fell and the air turned sweet with a strange earthy perfume I had never smelled.
This ritual was repeated every time it rained for the rest of the summer.
Come the next year, after four nearly cloudless months, I was in the office as the first monsoon rains began. Without even thinking about it I walked right outside and stared at the rain just like everyone else.
The North American Monsoon, otherwise known as the Mexican Monsoon or the Arizona Monsoon, is a pronounced weather pattern change over the Southwestern United States. It generally starts in early July and continues through mid-September.  
This seasonal pattern change brings moisture up from the Gulfs of California and Mexico. This departure from the normal west to east flow decreases rain on the Great Plains and increases rain on the east coast.  But most importantly, it brings the rains that bring the mountains and the deserts of the Southwest to life.
The coming of the monsoon ends the dry and clear skies of May and June and begins a daily pattern of slowly building giant clouds until the early afternoon and then, if you are lucky, it might rain a little.  
But more often than not it doesn’t.  
When it does, it lifts everyone’s mood at once and it becomes the most fascinating thing you have ever seen.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and @inlandwest


Living in Arizona, I know exactly how that feels. americanguide:

THE NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON - SOUTHWEST UNITED STATES
I first moved into the New Mexico high desert some years ago during the start of the monsoon season. Having come from water-rich Minnesota, I didn’t really fully understand its importance.
I vividly recall sitting in an office in full of people and hearing the first drops of rain hit our metal roof and then getting progressively louder and faster.  
One by one, each person in the office got up and walked outside until the entire office was standing under the awning staring, silently, at the rain as it fell and the air turned sweet with a strange earthy perfume I had never smelled.
This ritual was repeated every time it rained for the rest of the summer.
Come the next year, after four nearly cloudless months, I was in the office as the first monsoon rains began. Without even thinking about it I walked right outside and stared at the rain just like everyone else.
The North American Monsoon, otherwise known as the Mexican Monsoon or the Arizona Monsoon, is a pronounced weather pattern change over the Southwestern United States. It generally starts in early July and continues through mid-September.  
This seasonal pattern change brings moisture up from the Gulfs of California and Mexico. This departure from the normal west to east flow decreases rain on the Great Plains and increases rain on the east coast.  But most importantly, it brings the rains that bring the mountains and the deserts of the Southwest to life.
The coming of the monsoon ends the dry and clear skies of May and June and begins a daily pattern of slowly building giant clouds until the early afternoon and then, if you are lucky, it might rain a little.  
But more often than not it doesn’t.  
When it does, it lifts everyone’s mood at once and it becomes the most fascinating thing you have ever seen.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and @inlandwest


Living in Arizona, I know exactly how that feels. americanguide:

THE NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON - SOUTHWEST UNITED STATES
I first moved into the New Mexico high desert some years ago during the start of the monsoon season. Having come from water-rich Minnesota, I didn’t really fully understand its importance.
I vividly recall sitting in an office in full of people and hearing the first drops of rain hit our metal roof and then getting progressively louder and faster.  
One by one, each person in the office got up and walked outside until the entire office was standing under the awning staring, silently, at the rain as it fell and the air turned sweet with a strange earthy perfume I had never smelled.
This ritual was repeated every time it rained for the rest of the summer.
Come the next year, after four nearly cloudless months, I was in the office as the first monsoon rains began. Without even thinking about it I walked right outside and stared at the rain just like everyone else.
The North American Monsoon, otherwise known as the Mexican Monsoon or the Arizona Monsoon, is a pronounced weather pattern change over the Southwestern United States. It generally starts in early July and continues through mid-September.  
This seasonal pattern change brings moisture up from the Gulfs of California and Mexico. This departure from the normal west to east flow decreases rain on the Great Plains and increases rain on the east coast.  But most importantly, it brings the rains that bring the mountains and the deserts of the Southwest to life.
The coming of the monsoon ends the dry and clear skies of May and June and begins a daily pattern of slowly building giant clouds until the early afternoon and then, if you are lucky, it might rain a little.  
But more often than not it doesn’t.  
When it does, it lifts everyone’s mood at once and it becomes the most fascinating thing you have ever seen.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and @inlandwest


Living in Arizona, I know exactly how that feels. americanguide:

THE NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON - SOUTHWEST UNITED STATES
I first moved into the New Mexico high desert some years ago during the start of the monsoon season. Having come from water-rich Minnesota, I didn’t really fully understand its importance.
I vividly recall sitting in an office in full of people and hearing the first drops of rain hit our metal roof and then getting progressively louder and faster.  
One by one, each person in the office got up and walked outside until the entire office was standing under the awning staring, silently, at the rain as it fell and the air turned sweet with a strange earthy perfume I had never smelled.
This ritual was repeated every time it rained for the rest of the summer.
Come the next year, after four nearly cloudless months, I was in the office as the first monsoon rains began. Without even thinking about it I walked right outside and stared at the rain just like everyone else.
The North American Monsoon, otherwise known as the Mexican Monsoon or the Arizona Monsoon, is a pronounced weather pattern change over the Southwestern United States. It generally starts in early July and continues through mid-September.  
This seasonal pattern change brings moisture up from the Gulfs of California and Mexico. This departure from the normal west to east flow decreases rain on the Great Plains and increases rain on the east coast.  But most importantly, it brings the rains that bring the mountains and the deserts of the Southwest to life.
The coming of the monsoon ends the dry and clear skies of May and June and begins a daily pattern of slowly building giant clouds until the early afternoon and then, if you are lucky, it might rain a little.  
But more often than not it doesn’t.  
When it does, it lifts everyone’s mood at once and it becomes the most fascinating thing you have ever seen.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and @inlandwest


Living in Arizona, I know exactly how that feels. americanguide:

THE NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON - SOUTHWEST UNITED STATES
I first moved into the New Mexico high desert some years ago during the start of the monsoon season. Having come from water-rich Minnesota, I didn’t really fully understand its importance.
I vividly recall sitting in an office in full of people and hearing the first drops of rain hit our metal roof and then getting progressively louder and faster.  
One by one, each person in the office got up and walked outside until the entire office was standing under the awning staring, silently, at the rain as it fell and the air turned sweet with a strange earthy perfume I had never smelled.
This ritual was repeated every time it rained for the rest of the summer.
Come the next year, after four nearly cloudless months, I was in the office as the first monsoon rains began. Without even thinking about it I walked right outside and stared at the rain just like everyone else.
The North American Monsoon, otherwise known as the Mexican Monsoon or the Arizona Monsoon, is a pronounced weather pattern change over the Southwestern United States. It generally starts in early July and continues through mid-September.  
This seasonal pattern change brings moisture up from the Gulfs of California and Mexico. This departure from the normal west to east flow decreases rain on the Great Plains and increases rain on the east coast.  But most importantly, it brings the rains that bring the mountains and the deserts of the Southwest to life.
The coming of the monsoon ends the dry and clear skies of May and June and begins a daily pattern of slowly building giant clouds until the early afternoon and then, if you are lucky, it might rain a little.  
But more often than not it doesn’t.  
When it does, it lifts everyone’s mood at once and it becomes the most fascinating thing you have ever seen.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and @inlandwest


Living in Arizona, I know exactly how that feels. americanguide:

THE NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON - SOUTHWEST UNITED STATES
I first moved into the New Mexico high desert some years ago during the start of the monsoon season. Having come from water-rich Minnesota, I didn’t really fully understand its importance.
I vividly recall sitting in an office in full of people and hearing the first drops of rain hit our metal roof and then getting progressively louder and faster.  
One by one, each person in the office got up and walked outside until the entire office was standing under the awning staring, silently, at the rain as it fell and the air turned sweet with a strange earthy perfume I had never smelled.
This ritual was repeated every time it rained for the rest of the summer.
Come the next year, after four nearly cloudless months, I was in the office as the first monsoon rains began. Without even thinking about it I walked right outside and stared at the rain just like everyone else.
The North American Monsoon, otherwise known as the Mexican Monsoon or the Arizona Monsoon, is a pronounced weather pattern change over the Southwestern United States. It generally starts in early July and continues through mid-September.  
This seasonal pattern change brings moisture up from the Gulfs of California and Mexico. This departure from the normal west to east flow decreases rain on the Great Plains and increases rain on the east coast.  But most importantly, it brings the rains that bring the mountains and the deserts of the Southwest to life.
The coming of the monsoon ends the dry and clear skies of May and June and begins a daily pattern of slowly building giant clouds until the early afternoon and then, if you are lucky, it might rain a little.  
But more often than not it doesn’t.  
When it does, it lifts everyone’s mood at once and it becomes the most fascinating thing you have ever seen.
* * *
At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and @inlandwest


Living in Arizona, I know exactly how that feels.

americanguide:

THE NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON - SOUTHWEST UNITED STATES

I first moved into the New Mexico high desert some years ago during the start of the monsoon season. Having come from water-rich Minnesota, I didn’t really fully understand its importance.

I vividly recall sitting in an office in full of people and hearing the first drops of rain hit our metal roof and then getting progressively louder and faster. 

One by one, each person in the office got up and walked outside until the entire office was standing under the awning staring, silently, at the rain as it fell and the air turned sweet with a strange earthy perfume I had never smelled.

This ritual was repeated every time it rained for the rest of the summer.

Come the next year, after four nearly cloudless months, I was in the office as the first monsoon rains began. Without even thinking about it I walked right outside and stared at the rain just like everyone else.

The North American Monsoon, otherwise known as the Mexican Monsoon or the Arizona Monsoon, is a pronounced weather pattern change over the Southwestern United States. It generally starts in early July and continues through mid-September. 

This seasonal pattern change brings moisture up from the Gulfs of California and Mexico. This departure from the normal west to east flow decreases rain on the Great Plains and increases rain on the east coast.  But most importantly, it brings the rains that bring the mountains and the deserts of the Southwest to life.

The coming of the monsoon ends the dry and clear skies of May and June and begins a daily pattern of slowly building giant clouds until the early afternoon and then, if you are lucky, it might rain a little. 

But more often than not it doesn’t. 

When it does, it lifts everyone’s mood at once and it becomes the most fascinating thing you have ever seen.

* * *

At-Large Guide to the West James Orndorf was born in Minnesota, but knew at a very young age that the future lay out west. He is currently photographing and illustrating outside of Durango, Colorado. You can see what he’s up to at inlandwest.tumblr.com and @inlandwest

Living in Arizona, I know exactly how that feels.

(via textless)

Cornice on Treasure Mountain in Colorado along the Lead King Basin trail. June 2014.